Tag: health insurance marketplace

January Research Roundup: What We’re Reading

Welcome to another year of health policy research. In the first month of 2023, CHIR reviewed studies on how policies expanding health coverage would impact household spending, surprise medical bills generated by ground ambulance rides, and health care costs associated with substance use disorders.

December Research Roundup: What We’re Reading

Happy New Year! The holiday season may be over, but health policy researchers continue to bestow gifts onto our field. In December, we read about disruptions in health insurance coverage, the uninsured population, and gaps in provider network oversight. This roundup will highlight key findings of these articles, as well as their significance for our work.

Navigator Guide FAQs of the Week: Coverage of Reproductive Health Care

In most states, it’s the last week to sign up for marketplace plan that begins January 1. The Affordable Care Act expanded access to reproductive health services. As part of CHIR’s weekly installment of FAQs from our updated Navigator Resource Guide, we highlight questions about the marketplace and reproductive health care.

Navigator Guide FAQs of the Week: Family Glitch Fix

Open Enrollment for 2023 is in full swing, and our recently updated Navigator Guide has hundreds of FAQs that are likely top of mind for consumers and those assisting them. This week, CHIR’s Kristen Ukeomah highlights FAQs regarding the recent fix to the “family glitch.”

October Research Roundup: What We’re Reading

The leaves may be changing, but the importance of health policy research is evergreen. Last month, we read up on the results of a survey on the state of U.S. health insurance coverage, enrollment patterns on- and off-marketplace, and the impact of marketplace enrollment strategies.

August Research Roundup: What We’re Reading

For the August edition of our monthly research roundup, CHIR said farewell to summer by reviewing the latest health policy research. This month, we summarize studies on how the end of the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) will impact health coverage, global efforts to achieve universal health coverage, and the effects of eliminating nominal marketplace premiums.

Amidst Rising Overdose Deaths, Policymakers Look for Ways to Expand Access to Proven Opioid Use Disorder Treatment

As the number of opioid-related overdose fatalities remains alarmingly high, access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is inconsistent. Private insurance does not always cover the full range of MAT options, and when it does provide coverage cost sharing can be prohibitive. CHIR’s Rachel Swindle takes a look at state and federal reforms that can help lessen private insurance related barriers to treatment.

July Research Roundup: What We’re Reading

New health policy research topped CHIR’s list of beach reads this July. For the latest monthly research roundup, we reviewed studies on marketplace enrollees’ denied claims, how marketplace coverage has benefitted small business and self-employed workers, and out-of-pocket spending on insulin.

February Research Roundup: What We’re Reading

In honor of Black History Month, for the February edition of CHIR’s monthly research roundup we reviewed new health policy research centering the experiences of Black people in the U.S. health care system, including structural racism in health care policy, the impact of state Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementation on racial and ethnic minority populations, and trends in coverage, care access, and health outcomes among Black Americans.

January Research Roundup: What We’re Reading

In our newest monthly roundup of health policy research, CHIR’s Emma Walsh-Alker reviews studies on the potential of personalized phone outreach to boost marketplace enrollment, trends in the small-group health insurance market, and the Congressional Budget Office’s latest report comparing how much commercial insurers and Medicare pay for health services.

The opinions expressed here are solely those of the individual blog post authors and do not represent the views of Georgetown University, the Center on Health Insurance Reforms, any organization that the author is affiliated with, or the opinions of any other author who publishes on this blog.