What’s New for 2021 Marketplace Enrollment?

On November 1, the eighth open enrollment period begins for marketplace coverage under the Affordable Care Act. We at CHIR are tracking several policy changes that could affect marketplace enrollment and plan affordability in 2021, including: impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, new special enrollment periods, and recent court rulings on contraception coverage and the public charge rule. To learn what’s new for 2021, read our CHIRBlog summarizing the major policy changes consumers might encounter this year. Continue reading

There Are New Federal “Public Charge” Rules Going Into Effect Next Week: Here’s What You Need to Know

Beginning February 24, 2020, new rules that expand the criteria for determining whether certain immigrants would be considered a “public charge” are going into effect. While appeals of these new expanded rules make their way through the courts, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the policy may take effect in all states except Illinois, where a separate injunction remains statewide. As the changing rules can be confusing for consumers and assisters, we’ve updated our Navigator Resource Guide to help break it down. Continue reading

What’s New for 2020 Marketplace Enrollment?

On November 1, the seventh open enrollment period begins for marketplace coverage under the Affordable Care Act. We at CHIR are tracking several policy changes that could affect marketplace enrollment and plan affordability in 2020, including: changes to health reimbursement arrangements, new direct enrollment pathways, and recent court rulings on association health plans and the public charge rule. To learn what’s new for 2020, read our CHIRBlog summarizing the major policy changes consumers might encounter this year. Continue reading

Proposed “Public Charge” Rule Risks Immigrants’ Access to Private Coverage, Too

A federal proposal would make it more difficult for immigrants to obtain a green card if they’ve received certain public benefits like Medicaid. Although the policy doesn’t include the Affordable Care Act’s premium tax credits in its list of public benefits, there are several ways the proposed rule could place immigrants’ access to private coverage at risk. Sabrina Corlette takes a look. Continue reading