Virginia’s Enrollment Season Perfect Storm

Across the country, states are yet again dealing with policy changes just before the fall open enrollment season. Virginia, however, is a special case. The state is dealing with simultaneous implementation of Medicaid expansion, expanded short-term limited duration insurance and association health plans, and changes to the definition of sole proprietors for small employers, all with less funding for the navigator program. CHIR’s Olivia Hoppe breaks down how each change affects Virginians. Continue reading

New Report Shows Role of Medicaid Expansion in Rural Area, Small Town Health Coverage

Under the Affordable Care Act, 33 states and the District of Columbia expanded Medicaid, greatly increasing coverage under the public program. In a new report, our sister center,
the Center for Children and Families, examines the impact of Medicaid expansion on health coverage in rural areas and small towns, communities that for many years have faced high premiums and limited choices on the private insurance market. Continue reading

The Urban Institute’s New Proposal to Get Us Closer to Universal Coverage

In preparation for the day when a progressive vision for health reform may have more supporters in the White House and Congress, a number of leading members of Congress have developed new and innovative proposals. Everyone is trying to answer the same question: How do we get the most people covered in the most affordable way? The Urban Institute might have a good answer. CHIR’s Olivia Hoppe explains. Continue reading

February 2018 Research Round Up: What We’re Reading

In CHIRblog’s February installment of What We’re Reading, CHIR’s Olivia Hoppe digs into new research that highlights the consequences of the recent short-term limited-duration health plan rule, the effects of expanded private insurance on access to primary and specialty care, the impact of the ACA’s dependent coverage provision on birth and prenatal outcomes, and an assessment of state-level efforts to expand access, affordability, and quality of coverage. Continue reading

It’s enough to make you loopy: inside the Kafka-esque world of Medicaid “loopers”

Remember the Medicaid loopers? These are people who applied for coverage through the health insurance Marketplace, to be told they were initially assessed as Medicaid eligible, and to apply for coverage with their state’s Medicaid agency. If the Medicaid agency rejected their application, they were then bounced back to the Marketplace. In this blog post, Sabrina Corlette takes a look at one family’s efforts to get through a maze of bureaucracy to obtain coverage for their children. Continue reading

Republican Health Proposal Likely Means Less Coverage, Higher Costs, Fewer Consumer Protections

A trio of Republican Senators have introduced legislation repealing the Affordable Care Act and detailing alternative reforms to the health care system. However, as noted in this blog by Edwin Park of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the bill rolls back important insurance reforms, makes coverage less affordable for low income people, and hobbles the Medicaid program. Continue reading

New Report Adds Insights to Debate on Whether Florida Should Exercise Medicaid Option

Our colleagues at the Center for Children and Families are out with a new report analyzing the impact that Medicaid expansion would have in Florida. They found that 800,000 to 1.3 million uninsured Floridians would gain health coverage with no net cost to the state and potential state savings as high as $100 million per year. Joan Alker has more about the report and what it could mean for Floridians. Continue reading